Arizona car loans – Arizona Heli http://arizonaheli.com/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 18:03:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://arizonaheli.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/cropped-icon-32x32.png Arizona car loans – Arizona Heli http://arizonaheli.com/ 32 32 Experts explain where investors should focus their money in a high inflation environment https://arizonaheli.com/experts-explain-where-investors-should-focus-their-money-in-a-high-inflation-environment/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 18:03:15 +0000 https://arizonaheli.com/experts-explain-where-investors-should-focus-their-money-in-a-high-inflation-environment/ IInflation continued to rise in May, with worse than expected data. On June 10, the Consumer Price Index (CPI) rose 8.6% for the 12-month period ending in May, the largest 12-month increase since the period ending in December 1981. Live updates: financial trends, financial news and moreExplore: Everything you need to know about the impact […]]]>

IInflation continued to rise in May, with worse than expected data. On June 10, the Consumer Price Index (CPI) rose 8.6% for the 12-month period ending in May, the largest 12-month increase since the period ending in December 1981.

Live updates: financial trends, financial news and more
Explore: Everything you need to know about the impact of the Fed rate on your personal finances

This comes in a market that has entered bearish territory and where investors are getting more nervous by the day. Today, several experts are sharing their thoughts on where to invest in this highly inflationary and extremely volatile environment.

Gold and Bitcoin

Charlie Morris, CIO of ByteTree Asset Management and founder of ByteTree.com, a data platform for digital assets, told GOBankingRates that gold has always provided portfolio protection in inflationary environments, while Bitcoin is internet gold and should imitate that on time.

“It is important to note that inflation protection only works if the asset in question is cheap or at fair value. Overvalued assets will never be able to provide inflation protection,” he said. “In 2022, stocks and bonds bubbled up at the same time, and so neither asset class proved to be an effective inflation hedge. Bitcoin was also overvalued, but gold has traded close to fair value. Bitcoin is no longer too expensive,” he added.

He also noted that Gold is stable while Bitcoin is volatile.

“Because they naturally react differently to risky and risky market conditions, it’s hard to imagine them having a bubble at the same time,” he said, adding that they are not in competition, playing different roles, have a global cross-border and cultural appeal, and come together as a hedge against liquid inflation in all weathers.

Precious metals

Derek Izuel, CIO, Shelton Capital Management, told GOBankingRates that precious metal prices are determined by long-term expectations of actual rates of return. “With interest rates rising and Fed sentiment changing since late 2021, expectations for real rates have risen, turning positive for the first time since before the pandemic,” Izuel said. “Gold rises when those expectations are negative, so despite rising inflation, the Fed’s quick reaction is likely to put pressure on precious metals.”

Gold is back, wrote Edward Moya, senior market analyst, The Americas OANDA in a note sent to GOBankingRates. “Gold has resumed its role as a safe haven as financial markets worry about aggressive central bank tightening globally and US economic data slows. Recession fears are growing and this is triggering an exodus of equities and an influx of bullion safe-haven buying,” he added.

Immovable

Izuel said that with a slowing economy, rapidly rising mortgage rates and an overvalued housing market, real estate is likely to be weak going forward.

He added, however, that “there could be opportunities in counter-cyclical areas of real estate such as multi-family and healthcare-focused commercial buildings.”

Related: 6 Alternative Investments to Consider for Diversification in 2022

On top of that, according to Annuity.org, commercial real estate (CRE) has always been another effective hedge against inflation, as rising property values ​​and rents allow CRE owners to maintain real value. of their properties while generating higher incomes. overtime.

High yield and variable rate bank loans

High-yield bank loans (HYBLs), also known as leveraged loans, are another effective way to protect finances against inflation, Annuity.org noted, adding that the protective nature of these loans stems from the fact that their interest rates are periodically reset to keep pace with prevailing market rates, which are highly correlated to inflation. However, in times of economic difficulty, these can display volatility similar to that of equities.

“As a result, they experience periods of illiquidity, when assets cannot be quickly or easily converted into cash without loss of value. To minimize your exposure to this risk, be sure to invest in HYBLs through a fund-like vehicle with many individual positions,” according to Annuity.org.

Shares

According to Izuel, the best opportunities will be in international markets, as sector composition and relative valuation favor these stocks during a downturn in economic activity.

“Emerging markets will be strong when the economy recovers, and the removal of COVID restrictions in China could be an early catalyst,” he said, adding, “favoring smaller stocks in the United States – they will lead the recovery and the ride of the FANG stocks are over.

High-quality, dividend-paying commodities and stocks

Austin Graff, portfolio manager at TrueMark Investments, which manages DIVZ, a dividend-based ETF that functions as an inflation hedge, told GOBankingRates that the best inflation hedges in the current environment are commodities. commodities and high-quality dividend-paying stocks.

Graff explained that commodity prices have soared as demand outpaces limited global supply, and Fed Chairman Powell even indicated that he lacks the ability to control commodity prices – therefore, prices are likely to stay higher for longer than many realize.

In terms of high quality dividend payers, “they are a good option because they often have pricing power, allowing earnings, free cash flow and dividends to grow with inflationary price increases”, he added.

“At DIVZ, we are currently focused on investing in high-quality dividend payers that also have income directly linked to rising commodity prices,” he added. “Many of these companies have pledged to return excess cash flow generated by high commodity prices to investors in the form of higher dividends and share buybacks, thereby protecting investors from the effects of inflation. “

Impact on inflation: 2012 vs. 2022 prices may not be as different as you think
Discover: Four unusual places to invest money during a bear market

According to Graff, the names that fall into the category of beneficiaries of rising commodity prices would be Devon Energy (DVN), Exxon Mobil (XOM) and Coterra Energy (CTRA).

“We also have great exposure to names in healthcare and consumer staples that have pricing power like Johnson & Johnson (JNJ), UnitedHeatlh Group (UNH), Abbvie (ABBV), Philip Morris ( PM) and Altria Group (MO), ” he added.

More from GOBankingRates

This article originally appeared on GOBankingRates.com: Experts share where investors should focus their money in a high inflation environment

The views and opinions expressed herein are the views and opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Nasdaq, Inc.

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A map made from a Boeing 747; PayPal takes BNPL to another level https://arizonaheli.com/a-map-made-from-a-boeing-747-paypal-takes-bnpl-to-another-level/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 20:00:11 +0000 https://arizonaheli.com/a-map-made-from-a-boeing-747-paypal-takes-bnpl-to-another-level/ These Amex credit cards were made from a retired Boeing 747 In 2018, Delta Air Lines retired the last of its Boeing 747s, the iconic jumbo jets that, from their first flights in 1969, forever changed the scale and scope of commercial air travel. The airline has sent most of its decommissioned fleet to boneyards […]]]>

These Amex credit cards were made from a retired Boeing 747

In 2018, Delta Air Lines retired the last of its Boeing 747s, the iconic jumbo jets that, from their first flights in 1969, forever changed the scale and scope of commercial air travel. The airline has sent most of its decommissioned fleet to boneyards in Arizona, California and New Mexico, except for ship 6301, the first Delta 747-400 to ever take flight, which today includes the immersion 747 Experience at the Delta Flight Museum in Atlanta. For aircraft enthusiasts still nostalgic for the “Queen of the Skies”, the airline, in partnership with American Express, today announces a limited run of credit cards made from metal cut from the Delta 6307 ship, the very first recycled credit card. of a decommissioned 747. [Fast Company]

PayPal will allow users to spread the cost of purchases over 24 months

PayPal is expanding its buy now, pay later options with a longer term payment plan. The company allowed users to cover the cost of a purchase in a few interest-free payments and also offers credit cards. Pay Monthly, which is issued by WebBank, is another option for people in the United States. It is valid for purchases between $199 and $10,000. The cost will be spread over monthly installments between 6 and 24 months. If you select the Monthly payment option at checkout, then you will need to complete an application. If approved, you will be able to choose from three payment options with different timeframes. The APR is calculated on a risk basis and will range from zero to 29.99%. The first payment is due one month after purchase. [Engadget]

Fed tackles inflation with biggest rate hike since 1994

On Wednesday, the Federal Reserve stepped up its efforts to rein in high inflation by raising its key interest rate by three-quarters of a point — its biggest hike in nearly three decades — and signaling more rate hikes to come. which would increase the risk of another recession. The central bank is stepping up efforts to tighten credit and slow growth as inflation hit a four-decade high of 8.6%, spreading to more parts of the economy and showing no signs of slowing. Americans are also starting to expect high inflation to last longer than before. This sentiment could embed an inflationary psychology in the economy that would make it more difficult for inflation to return to the Fed’s 2% target. [Associated Press]

US banks are finally seeing a recovery in credit card borrowing

Big U.S. banks look poised to boost profits on a recovery in the struggling credit card industry, but a possible recession will set consumers back and lead to losses on outstanding loans. In times of economic stability, cards are one of the most profitable businesses for banks, and analysts say a continued recovery in card borrowing would bring relief to banks. Now, overall balances on credit cards and similar loans at U.S. banks are up 15%, as of May 25, from a year earlier, and are back near pre-pandemic levels, according to data. Federal Reserve data. Even better for banks, cardholders are now allowing more of those balances to roll over and incur interest charges instead of paying them off monthly. [Reuters]

American Express Launches First Crypto Product: A Card That Lets Users Earn Crypto Rewards

While American Express dashed hopes of a cryptocurrency-linked credit card in the near future, the card giant confirmed hints made earlier this year that it would offer crypto rewards, saying partnering with leading digital asset service Abra. The Abra Crypto Card will allow users to redeem crypto on any purchase, regardless of amount or category. Cardholders can choose from over 100 supported cryptocurrencies on the Abra platform, with no annual or foreign transaction fees. The card will also come with Amex offers for shopping, travel, dining and services, as well as pre-sale ticket access and purchase protections. [Fortune]

India lifts Mastercard ban

India lifted restrictions on Mastercard after the payments giant demonstrated “satisfactory compliance” with local South Asian market data storage rules. In a series of measures last year, the Reserve Bank of India indefinitely banned Mastercard, American Express and Diners Club from issuing new debit, credit or prepaid cards to customers over failure to comply with local rules data storage. Trade restrictions on American Express and Diners Club remain in place in the country, although they are allowed to continue serving their existing customer base. Unveiled in 2018, local data storage rules require payment companies to store all Indian transaction data on servers in the country. Mastercard has identified India as a key growth market and has invested over $2 billion in the country over the past decade. [Tech Crunch]

Samsung launches a new digital wallet

In an effort to streamline and provide access to the digital information people access every day, Samsung has unveiled its new wallet, which combines the existing Samsung Pay and Samsung Pass platforms into one. The new platform will store and allow users to access digital IDs, payment and loyalty cards, keys, boarding passes and more. Samsung Wallet uses Samsung Knox for military-grade security. Protections include fingerprint recognition and encryption to help protect sensitive user data. In addition to Samsung Knox, certain key sensitive elements of the wallet are stored in Secure Element, an isolated environment designed to help protect against digital and physical hacking. [Tech Republic]

Capital One Travel credit cards get expanded access to airport lounges

Capital One announced on Tuesday that Capital One Venture X, Venture and Spark Miles credit cards are getting better access to airport lounges around the world. Additionally, for a limited time, the cards will earn rewards for booking a rental car through the Turo app or the Turo website. The Venture X, Capital One’s highest travel card, will now offer unlimited access to more than 100 Plaza Premium lounges worldwide. This extends to the card’s Priority Pass membership, meaning cardholders can access more than 1,400 airport lounges worldwide through both memberships. And through May 16, 2023, the Venture X will earn 10x the miles on the dollar for rental cars booked on Turo.com or the Turo app. [ZD Net]

Grubhub adds instant payment option for delivery drivers

Grubhub has launched a new feature, called Instant Cashout via Direct to Debit, which gives its drivers immediate access to their earnings. The offer is enabled by Paypal’s payment management platform, Hyperwallet, which then uses Visa Direct to deposit the funds to a bank debit card. Instant Cashout is designed to give drivers more flexibility when it comes to accessing their payment securely and reliably. This payment option, which will be available to drivers this month, builds on Grubhub’s recent driver pay-per-mile increase to help offset high fuel costs and retain drivers. [Restaurant Dive]

How JPMorgan Chase is using payment data to appeal to fintech merchants

To help merchants improve their marketing, pricing and staffing strategies in a tightening economy, Chase this week began sharing in-depth insights into shopper habits gleaned from two feeds: its huge base US consumer card spend data center and its huge domestic card processing operations. The new resource, called Chase Customer Insights, was rolled out this week after months of testing with Chase small business customers and users of QuickAccept, the latest version of its small business card acceptance service. The bank is offering the product as fears of an economic downturn grow among small businesses. 57% of small business owners in May predicted the economy would deteriorate next year, down from 42% in April. This fear could cause small businesses to become more cautious in their marketing and operating decisions. [American Banker]

Use of gift cards is on the rise

According to Fiserv’s Q2 Gift Card Gauge, 37% of consumers have already taken advantage of a gift card promotion in 2022, and 58% say gift card promotions will motivate them to purchase more gift cards during this period of inflation. Consumers find the most value in gift card promotions that offer bonuses (eg, buy a $50 gift card and get a bonus $10 gift card as an incentive). While 51% of consumers are dramatically reducing their personal shopping habits due to inflation, only 23% of consumers are buying fewer gift cards. [CU Today]

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Anthony Gonzales won $90,000 in retroactive Social Security benefits https://arizonaheli.com/anthony-gonzales-won-90000-in-retroactive-social-security-benefits/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 11:30:30 +0000 https://arizonaheli.com/anthony-gonzales-won-90000-in-retroactive-social-security-benefits/ After more than 20 years together, Anthony Gonzales and her late husband Mark Johnson were only legally married six months before Johnson died. Gonzales was denied his survivor benefits, Social Security benefits usually granted after the death of a spouse. Seven years later, Gonzales finally received $1,700 a month in survivor benefits, plus $90,000 in […]]]>
  • After more than 20 years together, Anthony Gonzales and her late husband Mark Johnson were only legally married six months before Johnson died.
  • Gonzales was denied his survivor benefits, Social Security benefits usually granted after the death of a spouse.
  • Seven years later, Gonzales finally received $1,700 a month in survivor benefits, plus $90,000 in arrears.

Anthony Gonzales and Mark Johnson were married at the Bernalillo County Clerk’s Office in Albuquerque, New Mexico, alongside over 100 other LGBTQ+ couples, on August 27, 2013.

Same-sex marriage was legalized statewide in New Mexico in December 2013—and was legalized nationwide on June 26, 2015, by the Supreme Court—however, some local clerks in New Mexico have begun issuing marriage licenses to LGBTQ+ couples as early as August 2013, arguing that New Mexico’s definition of marriage made no mention of sex or gender.

Gonzales told Insider, “Mark had just had chemo a week or two before” – he had rectal cancer – “so it was tough for him. The chemo took a lot out of him physically. It left him weak. , but he was determined.”

As the couple had a ceremony in the late 90s, Johnson worried about what might happen to their estates if he died without being legally married to Gonzales. Gonzales says they “shared everything,” adding, “We had a common checking account that paid for our daily expenses. We each pay the same amount each month.

Johnson died on February 19, 2014, six months after legally marrying Gonzales at the county clerk’s office.

Gonzales applied for survivor benefits in 2015, but was denied

When he turned 60 in 2015, a year after Mark’s death, Gonzales was fired from his job. He asked for survivor benefits, social security benefits that widows and widowers receive when their spouse dies. Survivor benefits are typically used to pay bills the couple have shared and planned for in retirement, documented by a marriage license, shared loans, or a child’s birth certificate.

Gonzales was denied survivor benefits three weeks after submitting his application. He says: “I got a letter saying, ‘Sorry, but you weren’t married for the required nine months.’ And I was like, ‘Well, how could we meet this requirement when we couldn’t get married?’

Gonzales decided, “I’m going to fight this. What do I have to lose?” With the help of his neighbor, attorney Mia Touchet, he exhausted all Social Security appeals through 2018. Hearing officers at the Social Security office repeatedly told him that ‘just and fair change could only come from Congress, and that there was nothing they could do about it.

Lambda Legal took the case to court – and won

LGBTQ+ civil rights organization Lambda Legal heard about Gonzales’ efforts and asked him to testify in a class action lawsuit, Ely v. Saul, named after Michael Ely, another widower who was denied SSA survivor benefits.

While he was happy to receive support from Lambda Legal for his survivor benefits, Gonzales said the trial — which took place in Arizona — had an emotional impact on him. At the time, he was also caring for his mother, who lived to be 101, while mourning Johnson’s death.

He told Insider, “I’ve told my story so many times, and every time I start to cry. Even though it’s already been eight years since Mark died. But it’s still believed. This guy told me. still missing.”

Gonzales now receives $1,700 a month in survivor benefits and $90,000 in arrears

In May 2021, the U.S. District Court in Arizona ruled in favor of Ely and other same-sex couples who had been denied survivor benefits. According to records reviewed by Insider, Gonzales began receiving $1,700 a month in survivor benefits starting in May 2021, as well as $90,000 in back pay for the years he was denied benefits.

Before receiving the SSA funds, Gonzales says he was only getting $1,000 a month from his own Social Security benefits, which he had to withdraw earlier than expected because he was about to run out of money. 401(k). He says, “At one point I had $15,000 in credit card debt.”

Now that he has a lump sum of money to fall back on in case of an emergency, he says, “It’s a big relief, you know. I’m not constantly worried about money anymore.

There are resources for LGBTQ+ seniors who need survivor benefits

If you or your LGBTQ+ loved one has had difficulty accessing survivor benefits, go to your local Social Security office and mention either Ely v. Saul, or the twin case of Thornton v. Saul.

Instead of a traditional marriage license proving you’ve been married for nine months or more, you may need to bring the following documents:

  • Death certificate of your spouse
  • Photos or documents from your commitment ceremony
  • Shared financial documents, such as a mortgage, title, lease, or joint bank account statements
  • If you have children, your children’s birth certificate or adoption papers, preferably with both of you listed as the child’s legal parents

Social Security Administration assigned message codes EM-21007 SEN REV, code 529 Where EM-20046 SEN REV 2 SSA appeal cases involving LGBTQ+ people. Mention these codes for faster service at Social Security field offices.

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Carvana, “the Amazon of car dealerships”, wants the back of the driver’s seat https://arizonaheli.com/carvana-the-amazon-of-car-dealerships-wants-the-back-of-the-drivers-seat/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 22:07:54 +0000 https://arizonaheli.com/carvana-the-amazon-of-car-dealerships-wants-the-back-of-the-drivers-seat/ In the eyes of Ernie Garcia III, the problem is not existential. Garcia, Founder and CEO of Carvana (CVNA) – Get the Class A report from Carvana Co.the online used-car retailer, gave an overview of its company’s financial situation during a June 7 presentation at William Blair’s annual stock growth conference. Carvana, which has been […]]]>

In the eyes of Ernie Garcia III, the problem is not existential.

Garcia, Founder and CEO of Carvana (CVNA) – Get the Class A report from Carvana Co.the online used-car retailer, gave an overview of its company’s financial situation during a June 7 presentation at William Blair’s annual stock growth conference.

Carvana, which has been dubbed “the Amazon of car dealerships,” hasn’t seen much growth lately as its stock value has fallen dramatically.

An existential crisis?

On Aug. 10, 2021, shares of the Tempe, Arizona-based company hit a high of $370.10. On June 9, less than a year later, shares closed at $23.13.

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Planet Money Indicator: NPR https://arizonaheli.com/planet-money-indicator-npr/ Fri, 03 Jun 2022 23:11:58 +0000 https://arizonaheli.com/planet-money-indicator-npr/ SYLVIE DOUGLIS, BYLINE: NPR. (SOUNDBITE FROM DROP ELECTRIC SONG, “WAKING UP TO THE FIRE”) DARIAN WOODS, HOST: This is THE PLANET MONEY INDICATOR. I am Darian Woods. WAILIN WONG, HOST: And I’m Wailin Wong, and it’s Friday job. (SOUND EXCERPT OF AN AIR HORN, CROWD CHEERS) WOOD: That’s true. The jobs numbers came out today […]]]>


SYLVIE DOUGLIS, BYLINE: NPR.

(SOUNDBITE FROM DROP ELECTRIC SONG, “WAKING UP TO THE FIRE”)

DARIAN WOODS, HOST:

This is THE PLANET MONEY INDICATOR. I am Darian Woods.

WAILIN WONG, HOST:

And I’m Wailin Wong, and it’s Friday job.

(SOUND EXCERPT OF AN AIR HORN, CROWD CHEERS)

WOOD: That’s true. The jobs numbers came out today and show solid growth. We had 390,000 jobs added to the US economy in May, and the unemployment rate is unchanged at 3.6%.

WONG: At THE INDICATOR, job growth is one of our favorite economic indicators. It’s this really direct measurement of how the economy is doing in a way that has this tangible and widespread effect on ordinary people.

WOODS: And like all superfans, at THE INDICATOR, we like to go behind the scenes. We want to go behind the scenes of the green rooms of economic statistics and listen to bespectacled heroes enter numbers into databases. Last year we explained how price inflation data was collected, and now we will learn how employment figures are gathered.

WONG: Today on the show, behind the scenes at Friday’s Jobs, we listen to some well-kept secrets that could move the markets being whispered over the phone to a call center in Florida.

(MUSIC SOUND EXTRACTION)

WOODS: There are two main surveys that look at Friday jobs — one that surveys households for things like unemployment and a second survey of businesses and government agencies. This is called the establishment survey, and that’s where you get the employment numbers, those 390,000 jobs added to the economy in May. And each month, the establishment survey questions around 130,000 employers. It covers about a third of all non-agricultural workers in the country. Some employers complete the survey online, but much of it is done the old-fashioned way over the phone.

ERICA HENNION: Hi, Darian. This is Erica Hennion (ph) from the US Department of Labor. How are you this afternoon?

WOODS: I’m fine. How are you? How are you today?

HENNION: I’m fine.

WONG: Erica Hennion is an agent for the Bureau of Labor Statistics in the Department of Labor. She is one of about 300 people working on the phone to paint a big picture of jobs in America. Erica used to work as a bakery manager, so she’s no stranger to talking to people.

HENNION: And I’ll attribute that to my mother. She’s a hairdresser, so she’s a person who has always spoken to people. And so I’ve just been around that.

WOODS: I mean, hairdressers know everything, Wailin.

WONG: Yes, they do. I mean, I spilled a lot of secrets to my hairdresser.

WOODS: And that chatter is really important because when we spoke, Erica was aiming to make 400 calls for the month with people who don’t necessarily want to answer them.

HENNION: It gets stressful towards the end because you’re like, I want to do these numbers. A lot of companies, when they call and we talk to them, don’t because it’s not required.

WONG: The more people who pick up the phone, the more comprehensive the investigation and the more accurate Friday’s numbers will be.

WOODS: While I’m on the line, Erica calls a professional employers’ organization in Arizona. It’s a kind of company that shares hiring with small businesses.

(MUSIC SOUND EXTRACTION)

HENNION: This is Erica, from the US Department of Labor. How are you today?

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #1: Do good. I think that I…

HENNION: Fine.

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #1: …

HENNION: I know. It’s been a while for us (laughs).

WONG: The way the survey works is that the same company will get a call every month for two to four years. That way, they already know how the investigation works when Erica calls them.

HENNION: And so, for this pay period that included May 12, how many employees in total worked to receive their pay?

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #1: Eighty.

HENNION: Eighty – came up another person. Yay. We will take it.

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #1: It doesn’t happen very often lately, so we’ll take it (inaudible).

HENNION: No, I know.

WOODS: Erica asks a few more questions, the same ones she will ask all employers – how many of their employees are women; how many are in non-supervisory positions, total payroll costs for everyone, and total hours worked.

HENNION: So he’s asking me to put a little note for the statisticians on the reason for this increase.

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #1: Yeah. We…

WOODS: And Erica takes notes to explain why the employees of this company worked more hours this month.

HENNION: But you’re having a very happy Memorial Day, and I’ll get back to you in June, okay?

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #1: Okay. Thanks. You too have fun.

WOOD: Alright. So if that’s representative of the rest of the economy, then we’re doing pretty well in the labor market.

HENNION: Yes. I’ll take every little increase that I can see, sure.

(LAUGH)

HENNION: I’m relieved that this is another case I can tick off my list, and then I just put my nose in the grindstone and call the other 399 cases I have.

WOODS: Three hundred and ninety-nine.

HENNION: We call it smiling and dialing, and you just – you call, you collect the data, you thank it, you schedule it, and you hang up, and then you just make the next call. And then, all of a sudden, you look up and it’s lunchtime, and you’re like, where’s the morning gone?

WOODS: Has it gotten easier or harder to get people to react over the years?

HENNION: It got harder. It got harder over the years, especially after the pandemic. There was resistance from different respondents who don’t want to report the data because of the political economy as it is and all that, so there was resistance. There’s some mistrust there, and I’ve actually had a few people yell at me and yell at me, and then they called me back and apologized because they realized that they had gone after the wrong person. I am their outlet. I am the person they can physically talk to about the government.

WONG: Well, I’m glad they’re at least apologizing, but it’s like — maybe they should call their congressman instead of yelling at Erica.

WOODS: Yes, absolutely. Call your MP.

WONG: Erica says she tries to get people to stay on the phone by helping them understand why the employment numbers are so important. These numbers feed into city planning or business decisions regarding relocation, as well as major central bank decisions – the Federal Reserve.

WOODS: So remember the Federal Reserve has two terms. At the moment it is really focused on reducing price inflation, but it is also about keeping employment high – keeping employment high. And for those jobs numbers, the Federal Reserve Chairman and his colleagues are relying on numbers given to people like Erica at a Florida call center.

WONG: For now, the Federal Reserve may continue to raise interest rates, which will make mortgages or car loans more expensive. And with strong jobs numbers, the Federal Reserve is more likely to keep raising interest rates to fight inflation. But that could change if the labor market deteriorates.

HENNION: I mean, it affects the price of bread, milk and eggs, so it affects you. You just don’t see it.

WOODS: And in addition to explaining why the employment report matters, Erica also makes sure to build a strong relationship with the people she calls.

HENNION: I have a few respondents who share a birthday, and so I’m going to make sure to put, like, a note that they had a birthday, or it was their son’s birthday party, and their ask how it all happened – sort of thing.

WOODS: Oh, that’s so sweet.

HENNION: I’ve helped some people plan vacations in Florida…

WOODS: Oh, really?

HENNION: …Because they asked. They wanted to visit the area and I will help them find restaurants where the locals like to eat.

WONG: So let me understand – Erica is like an event planner. She remembers birthdays and special occasions.

WOODS: Yeah (laughs).

WONG: She’s like a travel agency (laughs).

WOOD: I know. There are a lot of jobs wrapped up in this interview work. It’s so amazing. Erica also gets advice on specific industries from people like her hairdresser mother.

HENNION: I’m like mom – I’m like salons – when shouldn’t I call a salon? And I try to take that into account. And I advised him to say that Tuesdays are his busiest day, so I might not call them on a Tuesday to follow up with them.

WONG: Erica’s soft skills are key to getting accurate numbers. Several months ago we had some jobs reports that didn’t look so stellar, but then they were changed to actually be quite good – the numbers have been revised upwards. And one of the reasons for these revisions was that the Bureau of Labor Statistics finally tracked down these respondents and obtained their missing numbers after the Jobs Friday deadline.

WOODS: But to get a head start, Erica makes another call — this one to a corporate office in California.

HENNION: How many employees in total worked or received a salary?

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #2: That would be 506 employees.

WOODS: And I feel like it’s time for me to leave Erica to continue her work.

HENNION: I still have eight calls left, and I’m here for about 45 more minutes.

WONG: Erica ended up getting 298 responses before the deadline – a little less than she had hoped, but not for lack of trying. She said there was one day when she made 115 massive calls.

WOODS: Well, at THE INDICATOR we’re always on the hunt for those jobs numbers, so thank you for doing the hard work to get those 300 or 400 calls every month and getting those numbers out there.

HENNION: Well, thank you (laughs).

(MUSIC SOUND EXTRACTION)

WOODS: Special thanks to Nicholas Johnson of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, who really helped make this whole episode possible.

WONG: This episode was produced by Jess Kung, with engineering by James Willetts. Corey Bridges did the fact check. Our lead producer, Viet Le, edited this episode, and Kate Concannon is editing the show. THE INDICATOR is an NPR production.

(MUSIC SOUND EXTRACTION)

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House Judiciary Committee set to advance firearms emergency measures https://arizonaheli.com/house-judiciary-committee-set-to-advance-firearms-emergency-measures/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 14:13:00 +0000 https://arizonaheli.com/house-judiciary-committee-set-to-advance-firearms-emergency-measures/ As the debate continued in the House Judiciary Committee, Rep. Lucy McBath (D-Ga.), who lost her teenage son a decade ago to gun violence, made an impassioned appeal to legislators to act. “How do we agree with this as a nation? Is this the status quo we all accept? McBath said, referring to a shooting […]]]>

As the debate continued in the House Judiciary Committee, Rep. Lucy McBath (D-Ga.), who lost her teenage son a decade ago to gun violence, made an impassioned appeal to legislators to act.

How do we agree with this as a nation? Is this the status quo we all accept? McBath said, referring to a shooting at a Tulsa hospital on Wednesday in which a man killed at least four people before turning a gun on himself.

“We can’t keep doing this,” McBath said. “An entire generation of children are learning that the adults they look up to can’t or won’t protect them.”

McBath’s 17-year-old son Jordan Davis was killed in 2012 after being confronted by Michael Dunn, a white man, for playing loud music in his car parked at a gas station in Jacksonville, Florida. After her son’s murder, McBath became a fierce gun control activist. She quit her job as a flight attendant and became a spokesperson for Everytown for Gun Safety and Moms Demand Action. In 2018, after the mass shooting that killed 17 students and employees at Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, McBath ran for Congress.

During her remarks on Thursday, McBath said she “dreamt” of who her son would become.

“I dreamed of seeing him walk across the stage for his high school graduation, filled with excitement for college, hope for his future, and dreams for the world that only a teenager can have,” he said. she stated.

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Is the American Dream of Homeownership Disappearing? https://arizonaheli.com/is-the-american-dream-of-homeownership-disappearing/ Fri, 27 May 2022 15:25:55 +0000 https://arizonaheli.com/is-the-american-dream-of-homeownership-disappearing/ How much money do we really need to buy a house and can we afford it? These are questions that real estate agents and mortgage professionals hear every day, and the answer is always the same, it all depends on many different factors. Sheetal Sawhney, home branch manager at CrossCountry Mortgage’s office in North Bergen, […]]]>

How much money do we really need to buy a house and can we afford it? These are questions that real estate agents and mortgage professionals hear every day, and the answer is always the same, it all depends on many different factors.

Sheetal Sawhney, home branch manager at CrossCountry Mortgage’s office in North Bergen, New Jersey, cites the top three things people will need to prequalify for a mortgage: tax returns (W-2 or 1099 and tax returns for the last two years), a recent credit report and a current list of assets (bank and investment statements).

CrossCountry Mortgage currently operates over 600 branches in all 50 states.

“In addition to income verification and credit reports, we need to figure out how much money they have for a down payment and closing costs, as this will affect their monthly mortgage payments,” she told Epoch Times.

“Sometimes first-time home buyers can borrow against their company’s 401K plans for down payments, but each company has its own guidelines.”

Typically, banks and mortgage companies require a 20% down payment, and anything less than that percentage will usually involve Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI) payments. Sawhney said Federal Housing Authority loans are also available for those who qualify, and they generally only require a 3.5% down payment for homes with one to four families.

“Right now the market has been so brutal,” she acknowledged. “We still have demand for homes, but there are fewer homes and more buyers, so we continue to see multiple bidding wars. Sellers want to accept the best offers, and many buyers who are able to offer higher down payments are preferred.

The latest data from Realtor.com puts the national median home price at $425,000. In this scenario, a homebuyer would need a down payment of $85,000 (20%) or $42,500 (10%), plus PMI fees.

“In either case, it can be very frustrating for first-time buyers who may not have a lot of savings,” Sawhney added. In some cases, lenders will accept a 5% down payment, which would translate to $21,250 plus PMI.

George Ratiu, senior economist at Realtor.com, said rising mortgage interest rates only compound the problem.

“The last four months have seen such a rapid acceleration in house prices and mortgage rates, and that combination has resulted in mortgage payments up to 50% higher than a year ago,” he said. at Epoch Times. “Compare that with the inflation rate of 8.3%, and you see a huge impact on people trying to qualify for a loan.”

Realtor.com’s recent report of the nation’s 20 “hottest housing markets” ranked Manchester, New Hampshire as number one. While the median listing price is above the national average – $462,000 – the report says the Manchester-Nashua area is relatively affordable compared to nearby Boston, where the median home price has recently climbed at $755,000. Manchester, as well as Concord, New Hampshire, with a median price of $427,000, also offer short trips to Boston.

La Crosse-Onalaska, Wisconsin, and Topeka, Kansas ranked third and fourth on the list with median sale prices of $300,000 and $195,000, respectively. Burlington, North Carolina took fifth place with a median home price of $350,000.

“Looking at the data we’ve collected, we continue to see the ‘doughnut effect,’ where homebuyers are extending their commute by up to two and a half hours from their local metro area, the center of the donut,” said Ratio. .

“We see the same thing on the West Coast, where people are shopping more than an hour from San Francisco or Los Angeles.”

A single-family home in Topeka, Kansas costs $177,777. (Courtesy of Realtor.com)

A search on the Realtor.com website for a $425,000 home in Manchester provides a rough estimate of expected monthly payments. With a 20% down payment and 5.25% interest and estimated local property taxes, the monthly payment could be in the range of $2,503. With a 10% down payment and the same interest rate, the monthly bill would be approximately $2,937.

“Everyone wants to know what’s going to happen, and while I see a leveling off, I don’t see a repeat of the 2008 recession,” Ratiu said.

“Underwriting home loans is like night and day compared to then, and there are a lot more regulations now. Plus, we still have strong demographics that support demand, and younger generations remain interested. »

Ratiu says Realtor.com has already started seeing more upcoming listings, including new construction. According to data from the National Association of Home Buildings (NAHB), there was a 13% increase in new home construction nationwide in 2020 and 2021.

Rose Quint, an economist at NAHB, told The Epoch Times that the majority of new construction is taking place in the south and west, leaving out the heavily populated northeast.

“During and after the pandemic, there was migration to areas like North Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Texas, Arizona, Colorado, and Idaho,” she said.

“People who now have the ability to work remotely are leaving major metropolitan areas to find housing in warmer, more spacious communities.”

In fact, she noted, 37% of newly built homes in 2020 sold for less than $300,000. However, statistics from April 2022 indicate that only 10% of homes sold nationally were under $300,000.

“Keep in mind that the cost of building materials has increased by about 35% and the price of wood is now more than twice what it was just two years ago,” he said. she stated.

“Builders now have to raise the price of homes, and wood alone can often add $30,000 to the price of a new home.”

While prospective homeowners in states like California, New York, Massachusetts and Washington, D.C. may not be affected by price increases for new homes in the South and West, Quint noted that residents of these regions are often overpriced in their own market.

“Affordability is going to be a serious issue in this country,” she revealed. “Just under 50% of homes sold in the United States in the first quarter of this year were affordable for the typical median-income family.”

The current national median family income is $90,000.

The NAHB expects single-family housing construction to be flat for the rest of 2022 and to decline about 6% in 2023. However, Quint noted that multi-family construction is very strong as people continue to look for opportunities rent.

Whether buying a new construction, single-family home, multi-unit building, condo or co-op, the key for lenders is determining an acceptable debt-to-income ratio. Sawhney said that will ultimately determine how much people can afford to spend on a home.

“Some people have a lot of debt like car loans or student loans, while others have very little debt,” she said. “We also factor in property taxes, which can often ruin a deal if they’re too high.”

In the New York metro area where Sawhney operates, many potential buyers often look for lower-cost alternatives like condos, co-ops, or “fixer-uppers.”

“For those who really want a more affordable, move-in-ready single-family home, the trend is to drive out of town to get a better deal,” she said.

She added that it’s not uncommon for people to look as far away as neighboring Pennsylvania. “A lot of people now only go to their city office two or three days a week, so they’re not commuting every day.”

With interest rates currently hovering at 5.25%, monthly mortgage payments can be hundreds of dollars more today than they were last year, when rates remained within the lower range of 4%.

“A lot of people who were pre-approved last year are finding they have to be pre-approved again because of the rate increases,” she added. “And now they may not be able to afford the same house at the price they would have in 2021.”

Sawhney suggests potential buyers seek out a banker or mortgage lender first, before working with a real estate professional, so they have a clear idea of ​​what they can afford.

She also offers her own list of do’s and don’ts for clients, including disclosing all other loans and not making major purchases such as a car, appliance or furniture that could affect the debt to income ratio. She also advises clients not to make any major career changes until the loan closes.

“Home ownership isn’t out of reach – all you need to do is do your homework first and decide what’s best for your budget.”

Marie Prenon

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Mary T. Prenon covers real estate and business. She has been a writer and journalist for over 25 years for various print and broadcast media in New York.

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Want to see a moon rock? There’s one in downtown Tucson https://arizonaheli.com/want-to-see-a-moon-rock-theres-one-in-downtown-tucson/ Thu, 26 May 2022 18:41:38 +0000 https://arizonaheli.com/want-to-see-a-moon-rock-theres-one-in-downtown-tucson/ By Kyle Mittan, University Communications Wednesday The rock is in the museum’s Mineral Evolution Gallery, the first gallery guests enter when leaving the lobby. Kyle Mittan/Academic Communications It took six days in space – and more than 18 hours of exploration on the surface of the Moon – for NASA astronauts David Scott and James […]]]>

By Kyle Mittan, University Communications

Wednesday

The rock is in the museum’s Mineral Evolution Gallery, the first gallery guests enter when leaving the lobby.
Kyle Mittan/Academic Communications

It took six days in space – and more than 18 hours of exploration on the surface of the Moon – for NASA astronauts David Scott and James Irwin to collect the 170 pounds of moon rock they brought back to Earth as part of NASA’s Apollo 15 mission in 1971.

Anyone in the Tucson area this summer is probably no more than a half-hour drive away from a quarter-pound piece of this transportation.

A moon rock is on display until mid-August at the University of Arizona’s Alfie Norville Gem & Mineral Museum, thanks to a six-month loan from NASA. He arrived at the museum in early February as the museum prepared for a grand opening in its new space at the historic Pima County Courthouse during the annual Tucson Gem, Mineral & Fossil Showcase.

Weighing 4 ounces and measuring about 3 inches long, the rock is the largest specimen NASA has loaned to museums from its collection at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, said Elisabeth Gassexhibition specialist at the Alfie Norville Gem & Mineral Museum.

The rock is in the museum’s Mineral Evolution Gallery, the first gallery guests enter when leaving the lobby.

“It’s a privilege to have this rock here,” Gass said. “Not every museum is qualified to have one due to the strict security protocols needed to keep the rock safe.”

Mark Kelly, a U.S. senator from Arizona and retired astronaut, was instrumental in helping the museum obtain the rock, Gass said. During a visit to the museum before its official opening, Kelly noticed that the museum had no moon rock and mentioned it to museum staff.

Later, even before the museum had applied for a moon rock loan, a NASA official called to ask if the museum was interested.

Kelly, apparently, had reached out to her NASA colleagues and “argued enough for them to call us,” Gass said with a laugh. It also helped speed up the application process, she added.

NASA Deputy Administrator Pam Melroy, during a visit to the UArizona campus earlier this month, expressed her gratitude to Kelly for her help in getting the rock to the museum.

“I think NASA can afford to give away a slice of this rock. Because we’re going back to get more,” Melroy said, referring to the upcoming Artemis missions, which aim to land the first woman and the first person of color on the moon.

Apollo 15 was the first of NASA’s Apollo “J” missions, which gave astronauts more time to explore the lunar surface than previous Apollo voyages. Scott, the mission commander, and Irwin, the lunar module pilot, made the trip to the surface of the moon; Alfred Worden, the mission’s third astronaut, piloted the command module and remained inside the module as it orbited the moon.

The lunar module landed in the plains near Hadley Rille, a valley on the moon. The area resembles the foothills at the base of many mountain ranges on Earth, Gass said.

Scott and Irwin spent about three days exploring the area. The mission marked the first time humans have driven a car on the moon, with the couple traveling 17.5 miles in the rover.

The rock now in the museum was collected from Station 8, a site about 410 feet from where the lunar module landed. Station 8 is also where astronauts set up the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package, or ALSEP, which NASA used until 1977 to collect data on the lunar surface.

The rock is a piece of marine basalt, a volcanic mineral found on the moon’s flat lowlands, said Gass, who is also a geologist. These lowlands, she added, can be seen in images of the moon taken from Earth; they appear as darker, shaded areas, contrasting with the lighter areas, which are the mountains. According to NASA, lunar basalts can be up to 3.3 billion years old, more than 98% of the minerals found on Earth.

The rock is at least the second moonstone that can be found in Tucson. The Pima Air & Space Museum also exhibits a rock, on permanent loan from NASA.

The Alfie Norville Gemstone and Mineral Museum stands out from other mineralogy museums as a destination to see both gemstones and minerals; minerals are inorganic solids that occur naturally in the earth’s crust, while gemstones are minerals that have been combined with something else for aesthetics.

Although moon rock is grounded in scientific discovery, there’s a lot to admire about it for those who just want to look at something pretty, Gass said.

“To see an unweathered, unweathered moon rock is really special,” Gass said.

The Alfie Norville Gem & Mineral Museum is located at the historic Pima County Courthouse, 115 N. Church Ave. The museum is open Wednesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., with last tickets sold out at 3 p.m. More information is available on the museum’s website.

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I took out $40,000 in student loans 10 years ago. I feel like I did everything right, but I barely made a dent in the payouts. https://arizonaheli.com/i-took-out-40000-in-student-loans-10-years-ago-i-feel-like-i-did-everything-right-but-i-barely-made-a-dent-in-the-payouts/ Thu, 26 May 2022 15:06:08 +0000 https://arizonaheli.com/i-took-out-40000-in-student-loans-10-years-ago-i-feel-like-i-did-everything-right-but-i-barely-made-a-dent-in-the-payouts/ This say-to-say essay is based on a conversation with McKenzie Decoite, a 31-year-old preschool teacher in Tucson, Arizona. It has been edited for length and clarity. I graduated from university 10 years ago and since then I have been working as a preschool teacher in public schools. I remember being in high school, when counselors […]]]>

This say-to-say essay is based on a conversation with McKenzie Decoite, a 31-year-old preschool teacher in Tucson, Arizona. It has been edited for length and clarity.

I graduated from university 10 years ago and since then I have been working as a preschool teacher in public schools.

I remember being in high school, when counselors and teachers said that not being able to afford college shouldn’t be a reason not to go to school. I also remember people telling me that student loan debt was the “right kind of debt” and that it wouldn’t count against me when it came time to get a mortgage or a car loan.

But 10 years after withdrawing $40,000 for school, I still owe $34,000. It’s crazy to know that it’s been a decade, and yet I’ve only been able to munch on a few thousand dollars.

Knowing that my student debt is hanging over my head causes me stress and anxiety.

It’s always been part of my financial calculations, and it affects everything in my life and how my husband and I can support our family. We have a 3 year old son and I just gave birth to another boy this month.

As a working middle class family, I feel like we are constantly in the red. We are still struggling because we earn too much to get any help, but we don’t earn enough to cover our daily expenses.

My husband doesn’t have a student loan, so luckily we only have to worry about mine. But it’s so stressful. With two years without a student loan, we’ve really been able to breathe and plan financially for our second child in a way that wouldn’t have been possible without the repayment break.

I know some people say $10,000 isn’t even enough to count when it comes to canceling student debt, but that would be a third of my total amount. I really hope Biden keeps his promise. I’m obviously grateful any time the date to restart loan repayments gets pushed back, but it’s also hard to plan your financial future when you don’t know what’s coming.

Payments are now supposed to restart in August, but they’ve been pushed back so many times I don’t know what’s going to happen. If we didn’t have to pay my student loans every month, I wouldn’t have to tinker with child care like I plan for my newborn son.

Right now, I think we’re planning on grandparents watching the baby one day and friends watching another day. But if I didn’t have my loans over my head, we could just pay for daycare instead of doing it this messy way.

It’s strange, because I feel like I’ve done all the right things

I went to high school, went to college, started a career, and started a family. But this debt is still hanging over my head. Especially as a teacher, it feels like a vicious circle of going into debt to become a teacher but not being able to earn a good living once there. Teachers are so underpaid and overworked, and I really wish educators were treated better in this country.

Right now it’s a waiting game to see if student loan payments will be pushed back or if my student loans will be forgiven. I just hope I find out soon so I can plan for my family’s financial future.

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Interested in solar panels? Here are a few tips. https://arizonaheli.com/interested-in-solar-panels-here-are-a-few-tips/ Tue, 24 May 2022 09:00:21 +0000 https://arizonaheli.com/interested-in-solar-panels-here-are-a-few-tips/ Thanks to advances in technology and manufacturing, the costs of solar panels have dropped over the past decade, making solar power more popular with homeowners. But figuring out how to add a solar power system to your roof can be daunting. Workers installed a solar and battery system this winter at my home in a […]]]>

Thanks to advances in technology and manufacturing, the costs of solar panels have dropped over the past decade, making solar power more popular with homeowners. But figuring out how to add a solar power system to your roof can be daunting.

Workers installed a solar and battery system this winter at my home in a New York suburb. This was a major investment, but it has already started to pay off by reducing utility bills and ensuring that we have at least some electricity during power outages, which is common here because storms often bring down power lines.

Interest in rooftop solar systems is high and growing as energy prices rise and concerns about climate change grow. Many people are also worried about power outages caused by extreme weather conditions linked to climate change. A 2019 Pew Charitable Trust survey found that 6% of Americans had already installed solar panels and a further 46% were considering doing so.

“The biggest thing is that solar power is much cheaper than it used to be, even in places like New York and Boston, where it tends to be more expensive than in the suburbs,” Anika Wistar said. Jones, director of affordable solar power at Solar One, an environmental education nonprofit in New York that helps affordable housing and low-income communities adopt solar power.

If you are interested in solar, here are some things to consider.

This question may seem simple, but finding the answer can be surprisingly complicated. An installer told me that my roof was so shaded by trees that the solar panels wouldn’t produce enough electricity to pay for the investment. Hearing another opinion was worth it: the installer I hired allayed those concerns and recommended tree pruning. On sunny days, my system often generates more energy than my family uses.

It can also be difficult to know what your local government and utility will allow, as the information is usually not readily available in plain language. I learned this lesson in my old home.

When I was living in New York, it took me months of research to learn that I couldn’t put panels on my roof. Turns out the city needs a big clear area on flat roofs like mine for firefighters to walk on. And I couldn’t install solar panels on a canopy – a roof frame that elevates the panels — because it would violate a city height restriction for homes on my block.

The best approach is to expand your network and talk to as many solar installers as possible. You can also check out neighbors who have installed solar panels on their roofs: people in many parts of the country have banded together in so-called solarization campaigns to jointly buy solar panels to get lower prices from the installers.

“It’s really been successful in neighborhoods and communities across the country,” said Gretchen Bradley, community solar manager at Solar One.

You should ask several installers for proposals. Price comparison services like EnergySage and SolarReviews make it easy to contact multiple installers.

When reviewing proposals, pay attention to the cost of the system per watt. This tells you how much you are paying for the power generating capacity of the system and allows you to compare offers.

The median quote for new rooftop solar systems is $2.75 per watt, according to EnergySage. That equates to about $26,125 for an average 9,500 watt system before factoring in a federal tax credit. For the 2022 tax year, the credit is 26% of the cost of the solar system.; it is expected to fall to 22% in 2023 and end in 2024. Many states, including Arizona, California, New York, and Massachusetts, also offer residents incentives to install solar systems, such as rebates and tax breaks.

Prices can vary widely due to location, local labor costs, and other factors, such as the type of home you live in and whether any other work is required prior to installation. If your roof is old or damaged, for example, it may need to be replaced before a solar system can be installed.

Rooftop solar systems can reduce monthly utility bills, depending on electricity rates, the amount of energy a home uses, and state policies. Systems that save more money will help buyers recoup their investment faster. Vikram Aggarwal, Managing Director and Founder of EnergySage, said solar systems should ideally pay for themselves within 10 years.

Excess electricity generated by rooftop systems is sent to the power grid, and utilities typically compensate homeowners for this energy through credits on their monthly bills. The value of these credits varies by state.

If you can afford to buy a solar system, you will get the best deal by paying cash. Systems purchased with loans or leases tend to cost more, especially over the term of the contract. Shopping around is your best protection against falling prey to dubious or predatory deals.

The main advantage of renting a solar power system is that your costs are usually fixed for the duration of the contract. But experts warn that leases can be difficult to obtain and could become a burden when you sell your home, as buyers may not want to accept your contract.

Mr. Aggarwal noted that leases “make sense” for some people who may not be earning enough to claim the federal tax credit. He suggested that people interested in solar leases get three or four quotes from different installers.

Adding a battery to your solar system will allow you to store some of the excess electricity it generates for use during a power outage or in the evenings and nights. A solar system without a battery will not provide you with electricity during an outage, as most residential systems automatically turn off when the grid fails.

Batteries can be expensive, especially if you want to run large devices and provide power for several hours or days. A 10 to 12 kilowatt-hour battery, which can store about a third of a home’s typical daily electricity use, costs about $13,000, according to EnergySage.

But another reason to buy a battery is that the federal tax credit for rooftop solar systems only applies to the costs of batteries purchased with solar panels, not batteries added in another year. of taxation. About 28% of residential solar systems installed in 2021 included batteries, up from 20% in 2020, according to a survey by EnergySage.

The Wirecutter, a New York Times product recommendation service, offers an in-depth guide to buying solar systems and batteries.

Most electric cars cannot power homes. Only a few models, like the Ford F-150 Lightning and Hyundai Ioniq 5, have this capability, and they’re incredibly rare.

But many energy experts believe it will eventually be common for car batteries to send power back to homes and the power grid.

In many parts of the United States, extended power outages may only occur once or twice a year. As a result, Mr Aggarwal said, it may not make sense to invest in an expensive household battery, which typically contains far less energy than electric car batteries. “Everyone is starting to talk about using your car to run your home.”

You may be able to join a community solar project, which is usually installed on open ground or on the roofs of warehouses and other large buildings.

Although the rules vary by state, community solar programs generally operate similarly. Members receive two bills per month: one from the community solar project and one from their utility. Projects sell electricity at less than the rate charged by your utility, and each kilowatt-hour of electricity you buy appears as a credit for one kilowatt-hour of energy on your utility bill.

New Yorkers who join a community solar project, for example, can save about 10% on their monthly electric bill, Ms. Bradley said. “It costs nothing to join or leave a project,” she added.

While most states allow community solar power, the majority of these projects are in just four states — Florida, Minnesota, New York and Massachusetts — according to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

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