Arizona title loans – Arizona Heli http://arizonaheli.com/ Sat, 14 May 2022 03:03:32 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://arizonaheli.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/cropped-icon-32x32.png Arizona title loans – Arizona Heli http://arizonaheli.com/ 32 32 Tempe-based Carvana abruptly lays off 2,500 employees in Phoenix https://arizonaheli.com/tempe-based-carvana-abruptly-lays-off-2500-employees-in-phoenix/ Fri, 13 May 2022 14:57:00 +0000 https://arizonaheli.com/tempe-based-carvana-abruptly-lays-off-2500-employees-in-phoenix/ Tempe-based online used-car retailer Carvana Co., America’s fastest-growing used-car dealership known for its towering multi-storey glass car vending machines, has abruptly laid off thousands of its employees on the Phoenix subway on Tuesday morning. A company spokesperson confirmed the mass layoffs with Phoenix New Times. The unexpected decision to lay off 2,500 employees is already […]]]>

Tempe-based online used-car retailer Carvana Co., America’s fastest-growing used-car dealership known for its towering multi-storey glass car vending machines, has abruptly laid off thousands of its employees on the Phoenix subway on Tuesday morning.

A company spokesperson confirmed the mass layoffs with Phoenix New Times.

The unexpected decision to lay off 2,500 employees is already shaking the workplace.

Davis Brown, a Carvana underwriter in Tempe, got to work Tuesday morning, ready for another day of financial reckoning for the auto giant, as he has done every day since October.

Instead, Brown was greeted with a company-wide email containing some unexpected news. His employer was laying off 12% of the company’s more than 20,000 workers.

“Carvana just announced massive layoffs, but no one knows who yet,” Brown said. “We are expected to work as if nothing has happened and we are told not to talk about it in Slack.”

Brown claims his colleagues were threatened and censored on Slack, a workplace messaging app, after they voiced their opposition to the large-scale layoffs.

As the eventful morning progressed, Brown learned that he had been spared sudden unemployment.

“I’m pissed for everyone who needs their jobs,” he said.

This was the result for thousands of his colleagues.

“It was horrible,” said Bridget Conrad, a coach who was fired on Tuesday. new times. “I’m just numb right now. It was thrown at us without notice.

Conrad, who has worked at Carvana’s Tempe headquarters since 2020, only heard about the mass layoffs on Monday night, when she was told Tuesday would be a work-from-home day for her. She helped train some of the people who were made redundant.

She planned to work her entire career and retire with Carvana.

His employer had other plans.

“Carvana has made the incredibly difficult decision to part ways with certain teammates primarily in our operating groups due to recent macroeconomic factors that are having a significant impact on automotive retail and our previously announced plans to better align staffing levels and spending on current sales volumes,” a Carvana spokesperson. Veronica Cardenas said in an email to new times.

Brown and others wonder if the action has anything to do with other big news from Carvana on Tuesday morning.

Just hours before officially downsizing, Carvana announced plans to pay $2.2 billion for Adesa US, the wholesale vehicle auction unit of Carmel, Indiana, KAR Auction Services Inc.

“It’s the profits on the people,” Conrad said.

A company spokesperson did not confirm any connection between the two events.

“We aim to implement this difficult decision in a transparent and thoughtful manner while providing meaningful assistance, resources and support to affected team members,” Cardenas said. “We believe that these decisions, while extremely difficult, will allow Carvana to restore a better balance between its sales volumes and its workforce and will facilitate the company’s return to effective growth as part of its mission to change the how people buy and sell cars.”

Affected workers, believing their employer was overzealous in recruiting a small army of new hires last year, say the company is simply trying to cover up its mistake.

Brown was recruited six months ago as part of a massive hiring initiative that has seen more than 100 new employees start work each week. Hiring just stopped in April.

“They massively overhired,” Brown said. new times. “Calling it ‘bullshit’ in Slack is threatened with being sent home for the day and all threads about it are instantly deleted.”

Brown first leaked the company-wide email to social chat website Reddit.

He plans to quit next week.

“They said they were preparing for tax season and ready for mandatory overtime,” Brown said. “Coming tax season, there was no overtime and we were offered unlimited unpaid time off.”

Conrad even worked reduced hours – just 35 hours a week – during what was supposed to be the busiest time of the year in early spring.

Carvana, which generated nearly $13 billion in gross revenue last year, according to February filings with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, promised each affected employee four weeks’ pay plus one week for each year of service with the company.

Management promised that “the door will be open to rehiring once we start growing again.”

The online car seller said the acquisition of Adesa would give it “significant flexibility” to grow in the future.

“Our team is bigger than we need and we can’t be sure growth will rebound fast enough to bring us all back into balance,” Carvana co-founder Ernie Garcia wrote in his e-mail. Tuesday morning email to the company, which was leaked to new times. “I want to tell you that I’m sorry. I know it doesn’t go very far to change what it means to you and your family. Anyway, it is true and it must be said.

Rejected workers like Conrad hope Carvana keeps his word and considers rehiring former employees after anticipated internal growth.

In the meantime, she consults the classifieds.

“Now I’m struggling,” Conrad said. “I don’t know where to go or what to do.


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Man accused of using stolen identities of UCSD students in bank and pandemic unemployment insurance fraud schemes | USAO-SDCA https://arizonaheli.com/man-accused-of-using-stolen-identities-of-ucsd-students-in-bank-and-pandemic-unemployment-insurance-fraud-schemes-usao-sdca/ Thu, 12 May 2022 00:02:20 +0000 https://arizonaheli.com/man-accused-of-using-stolen-identities-of-ucsd-students-in-bank-and-pandemic-unemployment-insurance-fraud-schemes-usao-sdca/ Assistant U.S. Attorney Eric R. Olah (619) 546-7540 SUMMARY OF PRESS RELEASE – May 11, 2022 SAN DIEGO — Nehemiah Joel Weaver has been indicted by a federal grand jury for using stolen personal information from University of California, San Diego students in bank fraud and unemployment insurance schemes in a pandemic. Weaver is charged […]]]>

Assistant U.S. Attorney Eric R. Olah (619) 546-7540

SUMMARY OF PRESS RELEASE – May 11, 2022

SAN DIEGO — Nehemiah Joel Weaver has been indicted by a federal grand jury for using stolen personal information from University of California, San Diego students in bank fraud and unemployment insurance schemes in a pandemic.

Weaver is charged with 60 counts, including bank fraud, mail fraud, wire fraud, aggravated identity theft, extortion and obstruction of justice.

Weaver’s co-defendant, Mia Nikole Bell, pleaded guilty last week to one count of bank fraud. In her plea agreement, Bell admitted that while employed at UCSD, she stole the personally identifiable information (“PII”) of at least eight students and shared it in an attempt to facilitate a bank fraud. Bell’s sentencing is set for August 15, 2022.

The indictment charges Weaver with using identities he obtained from Bell and other sources. Specifically, Weaver used stolen identities to apply for accounts and loans from a financial institution, to obtain over $200,000 in Employment Development Department (“EDD”) benefit payments from the State of California and to defraud the Arizona State Department of Economic Security. (“DES”) on more than $27,000.

As part of the CARES (Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security) Act of 2020, Congress granted new unemployment benefits to people affected by the COVID-19 pandemic who would otherwise not be eligible for unemployment benefits. unemployment insurance. The EDD administers unemployment insurance benefits in California and the DES in Arizona.

Additionally, the indictment includes an extortion charge based on text messages Weaver sent to an acquaintance demanding money and threatening that a third party would be “charged with fraud.” The indictment also includes one count of obstruction of justice based in part on Weaver sending a victim a photograph of the victim’s underage daughter along with text messages that read “Lol so dead that you don’t even know it yet” and “I can’t wait to see the look on your face. I paid a lot of money to see it.

U.S. Magistrate Judge Barbara L. Major ordered Weaver’s detention pending trial due to a serious flight risk and danger to the community. The next court hearing is a motion hearing and trial setting before U.S. District Judge Gonzalo P. Curiel on June 13, 2022.

If you believe you have been the victim of COVID-19 fraud, report it to the FBI immediately (visit ic3.gov, tips.fbi.gov or call 1-800-CALL-FBI or San Diego FBI at 858- 320-1800 In addition, the public is encouraged to report suspected fraud schemes related to COVID-19 by calling the National Center for Disaster Fraud (NCDF) hotline (1-866-720-5721) or emailing email to NCDF at catastrophe@leo.gov.

DEFENDANTS Case number 21-CR-2722-GPC

Nehemiah Joel Weaver Age: 36 San Diego, CA

Mia Nikole Bell Age: 31 Houston, Texas

FEES SUMMARY

Bank Fraud – Title 18, USC, Section 1344(1)

Maximum penalty: 30 years in prison, $1 million fine or double monetary gain/loss

Mail Fraud – Title 18, USC, Section 1341

Maximum penalty: twenty years in prison; Fine of $250,000 or two times the pecuniary gain/loss

Mail Fraud – Title 18, USC, Section 1343

Maximum penalty: twenty years in prison; Fine of $250,000 or two times the pecuniary gain/loss

Aggravated Identity Theft – Title 18, USC, Section 1028A

Penalty: Mandatory two years in prison

Extortion – Title 18, USC, Section 875(d)

Maximum penalty: two years in prison

Obstruction of Justice – Title 18, USC, Section 1503

Maximum penalty: ten years in prison; $250,000

Forfeiture – Title 18, USC, Sections 981(a)(1)(C), 982(a)(2), 982(b) and Title 28 USC Section 2461(c)

AGENCIES

United States Secret Service

San Diego Police Department

* The charges and allegations contained in an indictment are only charges and the accused are considered innocent until proven guilty.

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The Best Mid-Cap Dividend Stocks for 2022 https://arizonaheli.com/the-best-mid-cap-dividend-stocks-for-2022/ Sun, 08 May 2022 11:17:00 +0000 https://arizonaheli.com/the-best-mid-cap-dividend-stocks-for-2022/ five gold stars Getty Mid-cap dividend stocks are the best deal on the board right now. I like them because lame income investors don’t consider them. They attach to: Large Cap Stocks: For the dividend security. Small cap stocks: For the dividend growth. Meanwhile, many under-the-radar mid-cap stocks are between $2 billion and $10 billion […]]]>

Mid-cap dividend stocks are the best deal on the board right now. I like them because lame income investors don’t consider them. They attach to:

  • Large Cap Stocks: For the dividend security.
  • Small cap stocks: For the dividend growth.

Meanwhile, many under-the-radar mid-cap stocks are between $2 billion and $10 billion in market capitalization. They sit in a “sweet spot” that allows dividend security and growth.

This is why they generate big returns.

Touchstone Investments reports that when looking at 20-year trailing returns, mid-caps have experienced “generally higher absolute returns over the past 42 years”:

It’s easy to overlook these names – the media doesn’t talk about them as much and they tend to get a lot less analyst coverage than the Apples (AAPL) and Microsoft

MSFT
s (MSFT)
of the world. But this information vacuum is exactly how we can reap deep discounts in this mid-sized space.

Let’s talk about five mid cap stocks that are trading at low prices. I’m talking single-digit price-to-earnings (P/E) ratios with generous returns between 7.2% and 15.3% as I write (and no, that’s not a typo).

New York Community Bank

NYCB
(NYCB)

Dividend yield: 7.2%

Forward P/E: 6.7

New York Community Bancorp (NYCB) is the holding company of New York Community Bank, a savings bank with 237 branches serving five states – and rather than being regionally locked, it serves the Northeast (NY/New Jersey), Midwest ( Ohio), the southeast (Florida) and the southwest (Arizona).

Unlike many financial stocks with outsized returns, NYCB is just a regular, ordinary bank. It has nearly $60 billion in assets across a wide range of traditional offerings, such as checking and savings accounts, mortgages, business accounts, commercial loans, and more.

However, NYCB is trading at a low price – and offering an even bigger return than normal – due to a decline of around 30% from its 2022 highs, much worse than its contemporaries.

Part of that is just the fact that NYCB is dragged down for the financial sector downside. Part of that was recently released quarterly results that were just in line with estimates. But the extension of a merger with the Michigan headquarters is also weighing on stocks. Flagstar Bancorp (FBC), which would likely see the deal close in the second half of 2022, and the announcement that the new combined company would need the blessing of the Fed and the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency – and the latter is no slam- to soak. And even if it does, Flagstar, which relies heavily on its mortgage business, has its own struggles, as evidenced by a broad quarterly miss.

The sweet dividend looks safe, M&A or not. But whether NYCB can actually turn its value into an added advantage is somewhat of a gamble that hinges on both the successful merger with Flagstar and Flagstar carrying its weight.

Former International Republic

OR I
(OR I)

Dividend yield: 4.1%/10.7%

Forward P/E: 8.9

Another high-yield financier worth checking out is Former International Republic (ORI)– a provider of general and title insurance whose decent overall performance belies a much larger share of change being thrown at investors.

Old Republic is part of an elite group of stocks that most investors tend to overlook: the Dividend Aristocrats. “But wait,” you say, “I heard about it.” Yes, you’ve heard of the S&P 500 Dividend Aristocrats, the club where the likes of Coca Cola

KO
(KO)
and Procter & Gamble

PG
(PG)
hang out. But there are plenty of long-standing mid-cap dividend producers, and they’re recognized by their inclusion in the lesser-known S&P MidCap 400 Dividend Aristocrats.

ORI is a particularly notable mid-cap aristocrat, after four decades of uninterrupted payout increases.

But what really makes Old Republic International is that it continues to reliably grow its payout and has a pretty good consistent return while overseeing one of the most responsible dividend programs you’ll find – a program who, when times are good, can move that payment. at top speed. ORI has a two-part dividend system in which it pays regular quarterly dividends, but also special annual payments based on its earnings for the year. For example, a special dividend of $1.50 per share paid last fall pushes ORI’s yield into double digits. (Remember: these special dividends may vary from year to year.)

Crestwood Equity Partners LP (CEQP)

Dividend yield: 8.6%

Forward P/E: 12.4

Crestwood Equity Partners LP (CEQP) is an Intermediate Master Limited Partnership (MLP) that owns a number of assets involved in the gathering, processing, processing, compression and/or storage of natural gas, natural gas liquids, crude oil and even produced water. Its assets are primarily located in the Williston, Delaware and Powder River basins, as well as the Marcellus and Barnett shales.

Most investors would be happy with an overall return like CEQP’s, which is up 8% in a bear market. Opposite side? This is a far cry from other MLPs and the energy industry as a whole.

Maintaining CEQP was a generally lousy first quarter in which EBITDA (earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortization) and DCF (distributable cash flow, from which MLP distributions are paid) were both lower to Wall Street expectations.

That said, the company reaffirmed its full-year guidance and expects Williston, Powder River and Delaware to become more productive later in 2022. The company is also returning to distribution growth, which means that this big yield, if bought now, will become even bigger. based on your costs.

Gerdau (GGB)

Dividend yield: 9.4%

Forward P/E: 4.5

Brazilian steelmaker based in São Paulo Gerdau (GGB) has factories in its home country, as well as in Argentina, Canada, Mexico and a few other Latin American countries. It is also the largest long steel producer in the United States. (Long steel covers a number of products, such as rods, rails and cables, as well as structural beams and sections.)

Gerdau is like most material stocks in that they play in an extremely cyclical realm. Although its top and bottom lines have been going in the right direction for some time, you won’t get the same linear operational performance you expect from, say, a company selling soap. Revenues in 2018, for example, were 46.2 billion Brazilian reals, fell to 39.6 billion in 2019, rebounded to 43.8 billion in 2020 and climbed to 78.3 billion in 2021.

Fortunately, this is not an anomaly – sales are expected to remain at varying levels above 70 billion reals over the next two years. Really, Gerdau is just hanging around.

GGB is similar to the likes of General Motors

GM
(GM)
and Ford (F) in that it seems perpetually cheap, but a quick drop in April really put the stock in high-value territory.

It should be noted, however, that Gerdau is a “young man’s dividend action”. In other words, it can produce a lot of income, but it does not do so consistently. Gerdau will pay out at least 30% of the year’s adjusted net income as dividends, but payouts are ubiquitous. Its last four dividends were 3.95 cents, 29 cents, 7 cents and 10.5 cents. Planning for your retirement is difficult, but easier to manage if you allow funding to do its job over a few decades or so.

OneMain Financial (OMF)

Dividend yield: 7.7%/12.2%

Forward P/E: 5.3

OneMain Financial (OMF) provides personal installment loans to millions of Americans, many of whom have non-prime credit ratings.

It may be a turbulent business, but it’s sprouted like a weed during COVID. And while it’s cooling, it hasn’t cooled. Delinquencies, for example, have been up in recent months, but that’s mostly seasonal — they’re actually slightly lower year over year. The OMF share thus behaves admirably compared to the sector.

It is a robust company, which expects to be profitable even if the United States slips into recession. Meanwhile, it improves shareholder rewards in not one but two ways:

  • Higher redemptions: At the end of 2021, the company increased its repurchase authorization from $200 million to $300 million.
  • Larger dividends: In February 2022, the company announced a huge 35% increase in its quarterly payout, to 95 cents per share. It was 25 cents just three years ago.

Now, based on that quarterly dividend, OMF is yielding around 7.7%. But OneMain is another routine special dividend payer, and that the sum also improved for years. Once you factor in a special payout of $3.50 per share from August 2021, OMF’s actual return is actually over 12%.

Brett Owens is Chief Investment Strategist for Opposite perspectives. For more income ideas, get your free copy of his latest special report: Your early retirement portfolio: huge dividends, every month, forever.

Disclosure: none

]]> In 2020, Biden was a political juggernaut in Massachusetts. A new poll shows voters soured on him. A lot. https://arizonaheli.com/in-2020-biden-was-a-political-juggernaut-in-massachusetts-a-new-poll-shows-voters-soured-on-him-a-lot/ Sun, 01 May 2022 15:04:00 +0000 https://arizonaheli.com/in-2020-biden-was-a-political-juggernaut-in-massachusetts-a-new-poll-shows-voters-soured-on-him-a-lot/ Biden’s issues cut across multiple demographics. He fought the most with voters 35 or younger, with only 37% of them approving. And while almost all Republicans, unsurprisingly, say they disapprove of his professional performance, more than half of unregistered voters — Massachusetts’ largest voting bloc — said it also had a low opinion: just 39% […]]]>

Biden’s issues cut across multiple demographics. He fought the most with voters 35 or younger, with only 37% of them approving. And while almost all Republicans, unsurprisingly, say they disapprove of his professional performance, more than half of unregistered voters — Massachusetts’ largest voting bloc — said it also had a low opinion: just 39% say they approve, compared to 52% who don’t.

The results, especially in a reliable Democratic state, show a worrying lack of support for the president that reflects the depth of his political problems ahead of the midterm elections this fall. Voters in Massachusetts, in particular, appear to be embittered by the country’s economic outlook, with more than half – 51% – saying they believe the economy is in recession or depression, according to the poll.

“If you’re technically underwater in Massachusetts, that sends a powerful message to the country,” said David Paleologos, director of the University of Suffolk’s Center for Policy Research. Massachusetts Democrats, he noted, still reliably back Biden, with 75% approval of his work, but skewed margins among unregistered voters may speak louder.

“When independents in Massachusetts are so negative about an incumbent Democratic president who won the departure of that state, one wonders what an independent voter in Ohio, Nevada or New Hampshire thinks” , said Paleologos. “This poses a real midterm election challenge for Democrats.”

The poll had a margin of error of plus or minus 3.5 percentage points.

With his legislative agenda largely stalled and inflation rising rapidly, Biden’s approval rating among voters nationwide hovers around 41.5% in an average of Real Clear Politics polls. According to a Gallup poll dating back to President Eisenhower, only President Trump had a lower approval rating at this point in his mandate.

A top Biden adviser downplayed the importance of the polls in a recent tweet, referring to the fact that the French president won re-election despite being widely hated.

“President Macron appears to have secured a double-digit victory over LePen, at a time when his approval rating is at 36%,” White House Chief of Staff Ronald Klain wrote on April 24. “Hmmm….”

But many congressional Democrats are not so optimistic. Democrats facing tough races in New Hampshire, Arizona, Georgia and other swing states have distanced themselves from Biden in recent weeks on the issue of immigration in particular, criticizing the administration for its handling. border policy.

U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren also slammed Biden indirectly, warning in a recent op-ed that the Democrats’ “failure to do big things” could lead to election disaster.

“Democrats can’t bow to the wisdom of out-of-touch consultants who tell us to simply brag about our accomplishments,” she wrote in The New York Times. “Instead, Democrats need to deliver more of the president’s agenda — or we won’t be in the majority for much longer.”

The drop in support among young people in Massachusetts reflects a broader national trend that is lowering support for the president. Biden’s approval rating among voters under 30 nationwide has fallen to just 41%, 18 points lower than last year, according to the Harvard Kennedy School Institute’s youth poll. of Politics published last week.

Biden has shown some urgency in recent days in appealing to young voters, appearing closer to delivering on a campaign promise to provide student loan relief than he has in recent months. The president said last week he was “carefully considering” student loan debt forgiveness, with Democratic Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer telling reporters he believed Biden was close to make such a decision.

Congress, which is under very tight Democratic control, has passed a sweeping COVID relief bill and a $1.2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill since Biden took office. But objections from some within his own party, namely Senator Joe Manchin of West Virginia, have stalled progress on ambitious pledges on child care and climate change.

Massachusetts voters polled by the Globe expressed different grievances toward Biden. Patrick Carroll, a 45-year-old Spencer resident and unregistered voter, said while he thinks Biden has handled the Ukraine crisis well, the country needs a stronger, more public leader.

“I feel like our former president was so in front of us all the time, good or bad. And until the Ukraine crisis, Biden was almost absent,” Carroll said. it was a time when our country needed a bigger presence and a bigger force than it was offering.”

Gregg Housh, 45, of Malden is an unregistered voter who said he supported Bernie Sanders in the 2020 Democratic primary and voted for Biden in the general election – but as a “vote against Trump, not a vote for him”.

“He’s just not progressive,” Housh said of Biden. “He’s not moving us forward. We should have a lot more green initiatives. Student debt should just disappear.

Others, however, disagree. Stephen Goff, a 68-year-old retired Democrat from Chelmsford, said he thought Biden faced “challenges most people could never meet.”

“If we had the previous guy in the office now, I can’t imagine how messy things would be,” Goff said. “I realize that Joe Biden is at a very weak point right now. I don’t think it will last. »


Matt Stout can be contacted at matt.stout@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter @mattpstout. Liz Goodwin can be reached at elizabeth.goodwin@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter @lizcgoodwin.

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How to save more, even as inflation bites into income https://arizonaheli.com/how-to-save-more-even-as-inflation-bites-into-income/ Sun, 01 May 2022 13:01:11 +0000 https://arizonaheli.com/how-to-save-more-even-as-inflation-bites-into-income/ Saving money could become more difficult in the coming months, with inflation a problem and tens of millions of Americans without even a modest emergency fund. Tax season is over, which means two out of three Americans have recently received a refund, which is a nice cushion. But for many people, the hard work starts […]]]>

Saving money could become more difficult in the coming months, with inflation a problem and tens of millions of Americans without even a modest emergency fund.

Tax season is over, which means two out of three Americans have recently received a refund, which is a nice cushion. But for many people, the hard work starts now.

Here are several tactics and strategies, some quite simple, that could make saving easier.

Reframing the problem

Workplace 401(k)-style plans can be a great way to accumulate money, combining tax advantages and employer matching funds with the convenience of diverting money from every paycheck. . But many people still underuse these programs, perhaps because they don’t understand what it entails.

Participants in 401(k) programs must start by deciding what percentage of each paycheck they want to save, but the percentages confuse many people, according to a study by researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, Cornell University and UCLA. Rather than talking about percentage savings, employers could encourage participation if they explained it by giving up a penny or two of every dollar earned.

]]>
Biden’s mask mandate inaction is yet another delaying tactic https://arizonaheli.com/bidens-mask-mandate-inaction-is-yet-another-delaying-tactic/ Thu, 21 Apr 2022 12:38:00 +0000 https://arizonaheli.com/bidens-mask-mandate-inaction-is-yet-another-delaying-tactic/ Early in his career, Joe Biden was a busy young man: the sixth-youngest senator, an ambitious force in Washington, and a repeat presidential contender. From now on, at the top and at the end of his career, the president prefers to procrastinate. Although every leader makes a decision they would rather not make, delay has […]]]>

Early in his career, Joe Biden was a busy young man: the sixth-youngest senator, an ambitious force in Washington, and a repeat presidential contender. From now on, at the top and at the end of his career, the president prefers to procrastinate.

Although every leader makes a decision they would rather not make, delay has become a hallmark tactic of this presidency. Biden is currently juggling ending several COVID-inspired policies, and extending or ending them could create political difficulties. When it comes to border control, student debt and masking on planes, the White House chose to punt rather than make final decisions, either delaying the choice or leaving it to another part of the government.

A president faced with a divisive dilemma can take many different paths, as recent presidents have demonstrated. One path is exemplified by the episode “Sister Souljah,” when then-candidate Bill Clinton attacked the rapper for comments about race, knowing it would infuriate some Democratic voters, especially black people, but calculating that this would win him the support of moderates and centrists. Another path is that chosen by Donald Trump, who has repeatedly played at his base at the expense of winning over swing voters. (It should be noted that Clinton won re-election, unlike Trump.) Barack Obama tended to seek compromise, even when it was a bitter pill. It won him the biggest overhaul of the health insurance system in generations, but also a flawed and fragile law.

Biden preferred to take neither of those routes, an approach exemplified by his handling of student loan repayments. In March 2020, Congress suspended payments on federal student loans. Trump extended the freeze twice. Biden has now done so four times, most recently in early April, including twice since the Department of Education announced a “permanent” extension. The current expiration date is August 31.

The left wing of the Democratic Party wants Biden to simply pardon up to $50,000 per person via executive action. The White House maintains that it has no such authority and that only Congress can do so, though clearly Congress does not have the votes. Debt cancellation would likely be popular among younger voters, among whom Biden’s approval is cratering, and some polls suggest it is broadly popular. But moderate Democrats are wary, saying a jubilee would be costly, help only a small number of Americans and fuel inflation. Naturally, lenders are also pushing for the freeze to end.

The administration has attempted to appeal to all parties, resulting in confusing messages. In March, Chief of Staff Ron Klain bragged on Pod Save America, “Joe Biden, right now, is the only president in history where no one has paid his student loans during his entire presidency.” The “now” was doing a lot of work: On April 10, speaking on Fox News, publicist Jen Psaki said that borrowers should at some point start paying again. But wait! The following weekend, PSAki herself told Pod Save America that executive action was still possible.

Payback has become Schrödinger’s policy: as long as Biden doesn’t open the box, the cat isn’t dead or alive, and Biden doesn’t have to alienate anyone, at least not too much. This has obvious advantages – alienating people is bad – but also disadvantages: you don’t get much credit either. (Note the juxtaposition between Klain’s bragging and Biden’s poll of young voters.) Punting can be a useful tool, but at some point you have to put points on the board.

This same approach has also characterized much of the Biden administration’s handling of the pandemic. Since the start of the pandemic, the federal government has required masks on public transportation such as planes and trains, but the policy was set to expire this Monday. The politics of the term are a bit murky: Biden is eager to project a return to normalcy after the pandemic, and the airlines were campaigning for the end of the term; public health experts generally wanted the mandate to continue and, despite vocal opposition, polls suggest at least some public support for it. Last week, rather than choose, the administration extended it for another 15 days, until May 3.

On Monday, however, a federal judge ruled that the warrant was unconstitutional. Across many parts of the Democratic coalition, the decision was met with boos of derision, but the White House generally declined to appeal the ruling, issuing a noncommittal response. A day later, the Justice Department announced it would appeal if the CDC deemed it necessary. It was a punt within a punt. Finally, on Wednesday, the CDC said it would ask the Justice Department to appeal, even as travelers across the country ditched their masks.

Meanwhile, Biden faces a border conundrum. In March 2020, at the start of the pandemic, the Trump-era CDC issued an order requiring people to be turned back or deported upon entering the United States through the southern border, in order to control the spread of the coronavirus. The policy is known as Title 42, after the law that authorizes the order, and it bypasses the standard admission process at the border, including accepting asylum applications. (CDC career officials expressed some skepticism that the order was necessary at the time.)

The government continued to deport some migrants under Title 42, although the United States also began processing others under standard immigration law. On April 1, the CDC announced that “the CDC Director has determined that an order suspending the right to bring migrants into the United States is no longer necessary,” effective May 23.

Predictable chaos ensued. Republicans were less interested in the COVID control angle than in how politics kept people out of the country, and, sensing political advantage, accused Biden of being soft on the border. Democrats vulnerable to re-election in 2022 also opposed. Senator Mark Kelly of Arizona traveled to the US-Mexico border and, in a sign of the political importance of the issue, Senator Maggie Hassan of New Hampshire did the same, despite the fact that New Hampshire is away from Mexico. Even Biden’s close ally and protege Chris Coons, the Delaware senator, wondered if it was wise to end Title 42.

But if Biden simply reversed the CDC’s decision, that would cause problems as well. He vowed to “follow the science” and follow the lead of health officials, making it hard for him to dismiss their conclusion. In addition, many Democrats on the left flank of the party oppose Title 42 because it prevents migrants from seeking asylum. But on Tuesday Axios reported that Biden is now considering delaying the end of Title 42. Why navigate between Scylla and Charybdis when you can just drop anchor?

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Biden to attend White House Correspondents’ Association Gala | app https://arizonaheli.com/biden-to-attend-white-house-correspondents-association-gala-app/ Wed, 20 Apr 2022 16:28:23 +0000 https://arizonaheli.com/biden-to-attend-white-house-correspondents-association-gala-app/ The organization said in a tweet that it was thrilled to host Biden and First Lady Jill Biden at the April 30 dinner that will honor the First Amendment. × This page requires JavaScript. Javascript is required for you to play premium content. Please enable it in your browser settings. kAms@?2=5 %CF>A @AE65 E@ D^2CE:4=6^A@=:E:4D6?E6CE2:?>6?E5@?2=5ECF>A>65:22AE@A […]]]>

The organization said in a tweet that it was thrilled to host Biden and First Lady Jill Biden at the April 30 dinner that will honor the First Amendment.

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Javascript is required for you to play premium content. Please enable it in your browser settings.

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Guaranteed rate, Geneva Financial, AAG add new leaders https://arizonaheli.com/guaranteed-rate-geneva-financial-aag-add-new-leaders/ Wed, 13 Apr 2022 23:38:45 +0000 https://arizonaheli.com/guaranteed-rate-geneva-financial-aag-add-new-leaders/ From left to right: Eric Lapin, Mary Costello FormFree, provider of automated asset verification software to help lenders determine credit risk, recently named mortgage technology expert Eric Lapin as chief strategy officer. Lapin joins the Athens, GA-based technology company from Old Republic Title, where he was Senior Vice President of Corporate Development, National Agency Services, […]]]>

From left to right: Eric Lapin, Mary Costello

FormFree, provider of automated asset verification software to help lenders determine credit risk, recently named mortgage technology expert Eric Lapin as chief strategy officer. Lapin joins the Athens, GA-based technology company from Old Republic Title, where he was Senior Vice President of Corporate Development, National Agency Services, responsible for finding new solutions and new partners. as well as the business development of lenders and agencies. Previously, Lapin held other senior positions at major financial services companies, including Altisource, Black Knight, First American and Credit Suisse. As Chief Strategy Officer, Lapin will identify new growth opportunities and capital projects, oversee business initiatives and spearhead partnerships for FormFree.

The company also recently brought on Mary Costello as director of supplier management, risk and compliance. Costello comes to FormFree from Veterans United Home Loans, where she led and launched its vendor management program while ensuring compliance and due diligence in the lender’s relationship with its partners. In his new role, Costello will manage vendor partnerships alongside other FormFree executives and auditors to mitigate risk.

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Advocates: Students at Risk as AU Global Campus Problems Grow | Subscriber https://arizonaheli.com/advocates-students-at-risk-as-au-global-campus-problems-grow-subscriber/ Sat, 09 Apr 2022 15:00:00 +0000 https://arizonaheli.com/advocates-students-at-risk-as-au-global-campus-problems-grow-subscriber/ Students at an online school affiliated with the University of Arizona who receive education benefits from the Veterans Benefits Administration “may wish to consider transferring to another program or school,” wrote Thursday the VA in a letter to students. This is because the University of Arizona Global Campus is experiencing a sudden failure in its […]]]>

Students at an online school affiliated with the University of Arizona who receive education benefits from the Veterans Benefits Administration “may wish to consider transferring to another program or school,” wrote Thursday the VA in a letter to students.

This is because the University of Arizona Global Campus is experiencing a sudden failure in its ability to collect military education benefits. According to the letter, the VA does not want the approximately 3,500 students who use their GI bill to pay to attend UA Global Campus to lose the full scope of offers they have earned through their military service. These students brought in approximately $16.5 million in income to the school in 2020.

UA Global Campus President and CEO Paul Pastorek said in a statement that the school “will do everything in its power to keep students in class” during the period.

But this is the latest in a series of worrying developments for UA Global Campus and its 28,000 students. The majority of these students are non-traditional students, many of whom come from disadvantaged backgrounds, using some form of federal aid to pay for their education.

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Now, a dozen education advocacy groups want the US Department of Education to stop the UA Global Campus from collecting federal financial aid, “to protect the integrity of the student loan system.”

This comes a month after a California judge ruled over the for-profit Ashford University, which is what UA Global Campus was called before UA acquired its assets and turned it into a nonprofit in 2020. In the latest of several lawsuits filed against the school over the past decade, the judge ordered Ashford and its former parent company Zovio to pay $22.4 million in restitution for lying to students about the cost and quality of an education at Ashford.

On top of that, UA Global Campus is facing ongoing accreditation issues as well as the falling market performance of Zovio, who is in a 15-year contract with UA Global Campus through which he receives 19, 5% of the school’s tuition income for recruitment. , financial aid, technology and academic support services.

All of this is causing education advocates to sound the alarm about the school AU plans to absorb as part of a larger effort to grow its online education footprint.

Call for the removal of federal aid

“If I was a student, I definitely wouldn’t be enrolling right now given all the uncertainty,” said Bob Shireman, senior fellow at the Century Foundation, who has been outspoken in criticizing the UA Global Campus deal. “UA’s reputation has already been tarnished and the University of Arizona must step out of its marriage to Zovio and do the right thing for its students.”

A few days ago, Shireman joined 11 other advocacy organizations, including the American Federation of Teachers and the Center for Responsible Lending, to co-sign a call to action to the US Department of Education.

They asked the department to “immediately restrict UAGC’s access to federal student aid” unless and until “an appeal reverses the numerous findings of fraud,” referring to the ruling. of the Californian judge of March 3 concerning Ashford and Zovio.

The letter cited a federal law that states that if a school “has been judicially determined to have committed fraud” involving Title IV funding (which includes several forms of federal educational assistance, such as Pell grants and loans federal students), she is not eligible to receive these funds.

The letter also offered precedent for such action, reminding the department that in 2016 it halted Title IV funding for the for-profit Minnesota School of Business and its related school, Globe University, after a court ruled. found the schools guilty of consumer protection violations. .

Despite the deposition of a former UA Global Campus employee who referred to the UA-affiliated school as the same institution as Ashford “under a different name”, the March judge’s decision against Ashford and Zovio has said there was “insufficient evidence of continued misconduct” after 2017, when the complaint was filed.

This is the point that UA Global Campus officials are highlighting following the letter to the Department of Education.

“This letter references several old allegations and misrepresents many facts,” Linda Roberston, spokeswoman for UA Global Campus, said in an email. “UAGC, affiliated with the University of Arizona, is a new school with a new leadership team, new policies and procedures, and a student-centered orientation.”

Zovio in “peril”

But given Zovio’s significant involvement in the day-to-day operations of the school, David Halperin, an independent attorney and higher education advocate who also signed the letter to the Education Department, said he doesn’t Wasn’t sure if that statement was true.

“Zovio is still the courage of UAGC,” he said.

According to him, what is most troubling about the AU’s partnership with Zovio “is that they are essentially creating a predatory revenue stream that takes money from low-income people who will have to repay loans and use to subsidize the education of more privileged who may be admitted to the main campus.

But Halperin, who wants to see UA help UAGC students find other schools to go to or get refunds, said there were signs that investors in Zovio at least “are finally realizing of the peril that this company is in because of its own bad behavior.”

After reporting a 38.6% decline in year-over-year earnings during the third quarter of 2021, Zovio, which is a publicly traded company, canceled its scheduled call with investors to discuss its earnings. of the fourth quarter last week. Zovio did not respond to the Arizona Daily Star’s request for comment on the decision.

It’s unclear whether the Department of Education, which has yet to recognize UA Global Campus’s nonprofit status, will consider Zovio’s difficult financial situation. But when the Star asked the department how seriously it took the letter Halperin and others recently sent, a spokesperson said it was “engaged in rigorous oversight of high-risk institutions that may shut down” and that it “was closely reviewing the lawsuit(s), investigations and other actions of our state partners to ensure appropriate action is taken.

The results of this review are still awaited.

What is known, however, is that because the UA and the UA Foundation are now providing the financial support for the online school, the University of Arizona is now jointly and severally liable – possibly as much as $1 billion, according to a previous statement by AU Chairman Robert Robbins, should the department cut federal aid to the AU Global Campus.

Students ‘feel the pain’

The fact that federal veterans assistance, which is not part of Title IV funding, is already not available for UA Global Campus is concerning enough for some education advocates.

“The reality is that there are thousands of schools in America and none of them are facing this unique situation that is purely based on UAGC decisions,” said William Hubbard, vice-president. chair for veterans and military policy at Veterans Education Success, which is one of the advocacy organizations that signed the letter to the Department of Education.

“It’s shocking that they are so reckless with the welfare of their students, but not surprising given their long history of bad behavior,” he said. “Unfortunately, at the end of the day, it is their students who feel the pain.”

The expiration of VA benefits, which includes housing allowances, occurred after the California State Endorsing Agency for Veterans Education notified the school on March 31 that it was n would no longer approve of VA benefits after the school moved its headquarters from California to Arizona.

The school applied for benefits eligibility with the Arizona state approval agency in December, expecting that decision to be made now, but the agency has not yet approved the request.

“We understand that many are awaiting our decision on this. Our ultimate responsibility is to serve and care for students affiliated with the military,” the Arizona state endorsement agency said in an email to the Star. “We do this by exercising due diligence and ensuring schools meet all standards required by the U.S. Code and all applicable regulations.”

In a letter sent to the VA, Veterans Education Success President Carrie Wofford asked the organization “not to accept the request of another state approving agency to take over the approval of VA programs. UAGC”.

While the school awaits the decision from the approving agency, UA Global Campus is offering grants to cover the gap created for GI Bill recipients, although it does not pay housing allowances.

Without this housing allowance, many students “would be forced to work a second or even a third job to make ends meet,” Hubbard said. “Staying in school would no longer be an option.”

“Stop digging that hole”

The education and welfare of UA Global Campus students is also a major concern of UA faculty members, one vocal faction of which opposed the deal from the outset and accused the administrators not to include faculty, as they are obligated to do, in the decision-making process.

At the Arizona Board of Regents meeting on Thursday, Leila Hudson, UA faculty senator and incoming faculty president, called on the board, which publicly endorsed UA’s decision to absorb UA Global Campus, to proceed with “an orderly resolution of this moral problem”. unacceptable and financially dangerous situation” in “full Arizona sunshine, not behind closed doors”.

In an interview with the Star, Hudson opined that removing federal funding from the online school, according to the letter sent to the Department of Education, “would help prevent prospective students from being drawn there.”

She acknowledged, however, that it would also leave “students currently enrolled in this entity in another layer of entanglement and victimization.”

But with all she knows about Zovio and his history with the students, she says, “it might be appropriate to just stop digging that hole.”

Kathryn Palmer covers higher education for the Arizona Daily Star. Contact her by email at kpalmer@tucson.com or her new phone number, 520-496-9010.

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Covid updates: US officials set tight deadline to redesign vaccines https://arizonaheli.com/covid-updates-us-officials-set-tight-deadline-to-redesign-vaccines/ Fri, 08 Apr 2022 00:21:00 +0000 https://arizonaheli.com/covid-updates-us-officials-set-tight-deadline-to-redesign-vaccines/ Attorney General Merrick Garland on Capitol Hill in Washington in 2021.Credit…Al Drago for The New York Times Attorney General Merrick B. Garland and Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo said Wednesday they had tested positive for the coronavirus, the latest in a string of prominent Democrats, lawmakers and Biden administration officials to say that they had been […]]]>
Credit…Al Drago for The New York Times

Attorney General Merrick B. Garland and Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo said Wednesday they had tested positive for the coronavirus, the latest in a string of prominent Democrats, lawmakers and Biden administration officials to say that they had been infected.

Also on Wednesday, Representative Katherine Clark of Massachusetts, the Deputy Speaker of the House, and Representative Scott Peters of California announced their own positive tests.

The Department of Justice said in a statement that Mr Garland, 69, asked to be tested after learning he may have been exposed. Mr. Garland, who is vaccinated and boosted, had no symptoms and planned to work from home for at least five days, the department said. He will not return to the office until he tests negative at the end of this period.

The announcement about Mr. Garland came just hours after he gave a press conference at the Justice Department at 10 a.m., where he stood unmasked alongside several other officials, including Christopher A. Wray , the director of the FBI. The Justice Department statement announcing the test result followed several hours later.

Mr Garland spoke to reporters for more than half an hour, often swapping places with others on the briefing room podium.

A White House official said President Biden, who did not test positive for the coronavirus, was not considered a close contact. The official was not authorized to speak publicly and requested anonymity.

During a press briefing on Wednesday afternoon, Jen Psaki, the White House press secretary, said that although cases are increasing in Congress, the press and the White House, the administration does not plan to toughen protocols and plans to continue with its return-to-work plan. .

But Ms Psaki, who recently tested positive for the second time, added that the president has remained protected from the virus by taking “steps that go beyond what the CDC protocols are,” such as making sure that everyone who sees Mr. Biden is tested in advance and social distancing in meetings with the president, including in the Oval Office.

The president was last tested on Monday and received a negative result, according to the White House.

Ms. Raimondo, 50, tested positive after taking an at-home antigen test, the Commerce Department said in a statement Wednesday. The secretary, who is fully vaccinated and boosted, had mild symptoms and would self-isolate and work from home for five days before taking another test, in accordance with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines, the department said.

Her office said it was carrying out contact tracing and was in the process of notifying people she may have been in close contact with.

Mrs. Clark, 58, said on Twitter Wednesday morning that she had tested positive for the virus and was showing mild symptoms. She said she had been vaccinated and vaccinated.

“I am grateful to our healthcare professionals and researchers who have given us the tools to manage this deadly virus,” she said.

Mr Peters tweeted that he is “feeling well – thanks to vaccination and stimulation” and that he will isolate himself at home while his office remains fully operational.

Jamal Simmons, the vice president’s communications director, also tested positive for the virus on Wednesday, according to a White House statement. He will self-isolate and work from home, but Mr Simmons was in close contact with Vice President Kamala Harris. She will then see her doctor and plans to continue her public schedule.

Officials who announced their test results on Wednesday came the day after three other House Democrats — Representatives Joaquin Castro of Texas, Adam Schiff of California and Debbie Wasserman Schultz of Florida — said they had been tested positive.

The positive tests are a reminder that even as senior officials seek to step away from tough restrictions and encourage Americans to learn to live with the coronavirus, the pandemic continues, driven by the emergence of a new highly contagious whose spread worries experts. .

In March, at least nine House Democrats announced positive tests in the space of five days, with more than half of those cases emerging after lawmakers attended a party retreat in Philadelphia. Two other lawmakers who did not attend the retreat also tested positive at the same time.

Hillary Clinton and Doug Emhoff, the husband of Vice President Kamala Harris, also tested positive for the virus in March, as did Ms Psaki, who tested positive for the second time in five months, a day before she join Mr. Biden on a diplomatic trip to Europe.

Katie Rogers contributed report.

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